The Resource A Practical Course in Terminology Processing, (electronic resource)

A Practical Course in Terminology Processing, (electronic resource)

Label
A Practical Course in Terminology Processing
Title
A Practical Course in Terminology Processing
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Since the advent of the computer, terminology management can be carried out by almost anyone who has learnt to use a computer. Terminology management has proved to be an efficient tool in international communications in industry, education and international organisations. Software packages are readily available and international corporations often have their own terminology database. Following these developments, translators and terminologists are confronted with a specialised form of information management involving compilation and standardisation of vocabulary, storage, retrieval and updatin
Cataloging source
EBLCP
Dewey number
410/.285
Index
no index present
LC call number
P305 .S24 1990
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Label
A Practical Course in Terminology Processing, (electronic resource)
Link
http://library.quincycollege.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=429982
Instantiates
Publication
Note
4.3.3 Objectives of standardisation of terminology
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • A PRACTICAL COURSE IN TERMINOLOGY PROCESSING; Title page; Copyright page; Acknowledgements; Table of contents; Chapter One. INTRODUCTION WHAT IS TERMINOLOGY?; 1.1 A new field of enquiry and activity; 1.2 Definition; 1.3 Terminology and related disciplines; 1.3.1 Terminology and Information Science; 1.4 Theoretical premises; 1.5 Requirements of an applied field of study; 1.6 Conflicts between theory and practice; 1.7 The purpose and structure of this book; Chapter Two. THE COGNITIVE DIMENSION; 2.1 A theory of reference; 2.1.1 A model of knowledge; 2.1.2 Subject disciplines
  • 2.1.3 The social norm2.1.4 Knowledge and reference; 2.1.5 Special subject languages; 2.1.6 Words, terms and standardised terms; 2.2 A theory of concepts; 2.2.1 Concepts: definition; 2.2.2 Characteristics; 2.2.3 Types of concepts; 2.2.4 Structures of concepts; 2.2.4.1. Relationships; 2.2.4.2. Complex relationships; 2.2.5 Subject classification; 2.3 Definitions and alternatives; 2.3.1 Definition of definition in terminology; 2.3.1.1 Scope of definitions; 2.3.2 Methods of definition; 2.3.2.1. Rules of definition; 2.3.3 Definitions in context
  • 2.3.3.1. Definition as part of the semantic specification2.3.4 The purpose of definitions in terminology; 2.3.4.1. Functional types of definitions; 2.3.4.2. Needs analyses; 2.3.5 Use of existing definitions; 2.3.5.1. The need for terminological definitions; 2.4 Terminological definitions and relationships; 2.4.1 Complementarity of definition and relationships; Chapter Three. THE LINGUISTIC DIMENSION; 3.1 A theory of terms; 3.1.1 The onomasiological approach; 3.1.2 Terms and their forms; 3.1.2.1. Terms in dictionaries; 3.1.2.2. Homonyms, synonyms and variants; 3.1.2.3. Status of terms
  • 3.1.3 Processes of terminologisation3.2 Term formation: theory and practice; 3.2.1 Motivation for designation; 3.2.1.1. Names and proper nouns; 3.2.2 Patterns of term formation; 3.2.2.1. Use of existing resources; 3.2.2.2. Modifica don of existing resources; 3.2.2.3. Creation of new lexical entities (neologisms); 3.2.3 Pragmatic aspects of term formation; 3.2.3.1. Trends in secondary term formation; 3.2.3.2. Attitudes to bonvwing; 3.2.4 Technical support for term creation; 3.3 Guidelines for the creation of terms; 3.3.1 International guidelines; 3.3.2 Criteria and rules for naming
  • 3.4 Nomenclatural systems3.4.1 General principles; 3.4.2 Features of medical nomenclature; 3.4.3 Features of biological nomenclature; 3.4.4 Features of chemical nomenclature; Chapter Four. THE COMMUNICATIVE DIMENSION; 4.1 A model of communication; 4.1.1 The choice of intention; 4.1.2 The selection of knowledge; 4.1.3 The choice of language; 4.2 The functional efficacy of terms; 4.2.1 Lexical expression of economy; 4.2.1 Precision of expression; 4.2.3 Appropriateness of expression; 4.3 Standardisation; 4.3.1 Principles of standardisation; 4.3.2 Instalments of standardisation
Control code
ocn773566982
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (access may be restricted)
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Access restricted to subscribing institution
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Specific material designation
remote
Label
A Practical Course in Terminology Processing, (electronic resource)
Link
http://library.quincycollege.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=429982
Publication
Note
4.3.3 Objectives of standardisation of terminology
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • A PRACTICAL COURSE IN TERMINOLOGY PROCESSING; Title page; Copyright page; Acknowledgements; Table of contents; Chapter One. INTRODUCTION WHAT IS TERMINOLOGY?; 1.1 A new field of enquiry and activity; 1.2 Definition; 1.3 Terminology and related disciplines; 1.3.1 Terminology and Information Science; 1.4 Theoretical premises; 1.5 Requirements of an applied field of study; 1.6 Conflicts between theory and practice; 1.7 The purpose and structure of this book; Chapter Two. THE COGNITIVE DIMENSION; 2.1 A theory of reference; 2.1.1 A model of knowledge; 2.1.2 Subject disciplines
  • 2.1.3 The social norm2.1.4 Knowledge and reference; 2.1.5 Special subject languages; 2.1.6 Words, terms and standardised terms; 2.2 A theory of concepts; 2.2.1 Concepts: definition; 2.2.2 Characteristics; 2.2.3 Types of concepts; 2.2.4 Structures of concepts; 2.2.4.1. Relationships; 2.2.4.2. Complex relationships; 2.2.5 Subject classification; 2.3 Definitions and alternatives; 2.3.1 Definition of definition in terminology; 2.3.1.1 Scope of definitions; 2.3.2 Methods of definition; 2.3.2.1. Rules of definition; 2.3.3 Definitions in context
  • 2.3.3.1. Definition as part of the semantic specification2.3.4 The purpose of definitions in terminology; 2.3.4.1. Functional types of definitions; 2.3.4.2. Needs analyses; 2.3.5 Use of existing definitions; 2.3.5.1. The need for terminological definitions; 2.4 Terminological definitions and relationships; 2.4.1 Complementarity of definition and relationships; Chapter Three. THE LINGUISTIC DIMENSION; 3.1 A theory of terms; 3.1.1 The onomasiological approach; 3.1.2 Terms and their forms; 3.1.2.1. Terms in dictionaries; 3.1.2.2. Homonyms, synonyms and variants; 3.1.2.3. Status of terms
  • 3.1.3 Processes of terminologisation3.2 Term formation: theory and practice; 3.2.1 Motivation for designation; 3.2.1.1. Names and proper nouns; 3.2.2 Patterns of term formation; 3.2.2.1. Use of existing resources; 3.2.2.2. Modifica don of existing resources; 3.2.2.3. Creation of new lexical entities (neologisms); 3.2.3 Pragmatic aspects of term formation; 3.2.3.1. Trends in secondary term formation; 3.2.3.2. Attitudes to bonvwing; 3.2.4 Technical support for term creation; 3.3 Guidelines for the creation of terms; 3.3.1 International guidelines; 3.3.2 Criteria and rules for naming
  • 3.4 Nomenclatural systems3.4.1 General principles; 3.4.2 Features of medical nomenclature; 3.4.3 Features of biological nomenclature; 3.4.4 Features of chemical nomenclature; Chapter Four. THE COMMUNICATIVE DIMENSION; 4.1 A model of communication; 4.1.1 The choice of intention; 4.1.2 The selection of knowledge; 4.1.3 The choice of language; 4.2 The functional efficacy of terms; 4.2.1 Lexical expression of economy; 4.2.1 Precision of expression; 4.2.3 Appropriateness of expression; 4.3 Standardisation; 4.3.1 Principles of standardisation; 4.3.2 Instalments of standardisation
Control code
ocn773566982
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (access may be restricted)
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Access restricted to subscribing institution
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Specific material designation
remote

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