The Resource Urban Bahamian Creole : system and variation, Stephanie Hackert, (electronic resource/)

Urban Bahamian Creole : system and variation, Stephanie Hackert, (electronic resource/)

Label
Urban Bahamian Creole : system and variation
Title
Urban Bahamian Creole
Title remainder
system and variation
Statement of responsibility
Stephanie Hackert
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
This volume, a detailed empirical study of the creole English spoken in the Bahamian capital, Nassau, contributes to our understanding of both urban creoles and tense-aspect marking in creoles. The first part traces the development of a creole in the Bahamas via socio-demographic data and outlines its current status and functions vis-a-vis the standard in politics, the media, and education. The linguistic chapters combine typological and variationist methods to describe exhaustively a comprehensive grammatical subsystem, past temporal reference, offering a discourse-based approach to such cont
Member of
Cataloging source
E7B
Dewey number
427/.97296
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
PM7874.B24
LC item number
H33 2004eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Varieties of English around the world,
Series volume
v. G32
Label
Urban Bahamian Creole : system and variation, Stephanie Hackert, (electronic resource/)
Link
http://library.quincycollege.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=410710
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Urban Bahamian Creole System and variation; Editorial page; Title page; Copyright page; Table of contents; Map; Abbreviations; List of Tables; List of Figures; Acknowledgements; CHAPTER 1. Introduction; CHAPTER 2. Methodology; 2.1 Previous Research on Language in the Bahamas; 2.2 Tense, Mood, and Aspect in Creoles: Models and Approaches; 2.2.1 Bickertons Analysis of Creole TMA Systems; 2.2.2 Linguistic Typology and TMA; 2.3 Fieldwork and Data Analysis; 2.3.1 Eliciting Conversational Data; 2.3.1.1 Entering the Community and Building a Sample; 2.3.1.2 The Sociolinguistic Interview
  • 2.3.1.3 The Subsample2.3.2 Quantitative Analysis; 2.3.3 The Tense-Mood-Aspect Questionnaire; 2.3.4 The Professionals Sample; 2.3.5 Terminology and Orthography; CHAPTER 3. Sociohistory and Sociolinguistics; 3.1 The Bahamas: Topography and Population; 3.2 English in the Bahamas: From Contact to Creole; 3.2.1 The Early Colonial Period; 3.2.2 Loyalist Times; 3.2.3 The Abolition of the Slave Trade and Beyond; 3.3 The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries; 3.3.1 The Urban Experience; 3.3.2 A Brief Social Geography of Nassau Today; 3.4 The Sociolinguistics of Bahamian Creole English
  • 3.4.1 Language and Politics3.4.2 Language and the Media; 3.4.3 Language and Education; CHAPTER 4. Past Temporal Reference: Categories, Meanings, and Uses; 4.1 Aspect: Perfective, Progressive, Habitual, and Completive; 4.1.1 The Unmarked Verb; 4.1.2 Imperfective Categories; 4.1.2.1 The Progressive; 4.1.2.2 Habituais; 4.1.3 The Completive; 4.1.3.1 Main- Verbal done; 4.1.3.2 The Syntax and Semantics of Completive done; 4.2 Tense: The Relative Past; 4.2.1 The Use of did in Bahamian Creole; 4.2.2 Preverbal did; 4.2.2.1 Did as an AnteriorMarker?; 4.2.2.2 Did as a Relative Past Marker?
  • 4.2.2.3 Did as a Background Marker?4.2.2.4 Speaker Perceptions and Social Profile of did; 4.3 Perfect Meanings and Their Realizations; 4.4 Copula Structures; 4.5 Past Reference in Urban Bahamian Creole: A Summary; CHAPTER 5. Past Marking by Verb Inflection; 5.1 Circumscribing the Envelope of Variation: Count and Dont Count Cases; 5.1.1 Lexical Verbs in Finite Form; 5.1.2 Absolute Past Temporal Reference; 5.1.2.1 Perfect Structures; 5.1.2.2 Past Habituais; 5.1.2.3 Progressive Meaning; 5.1.2.4 Indirect or Reported Speech; 5.1.2.5 Absolute Past Structures Excluded
  • 5.1.3 Non-Past Reference5.1.3.1 Inclusive Time; 5.1.3.2 Irrealis Contexts; 5.1.4 Discourse-Specific Characteristics; 5.1.4.1 Hesitation, False Starts, Ellipsis, Repetition; 5.1.4.2 Fixed Expressions and Imitative Speech; 5.1.4.3 Indeterminate Cases; 5.1.5 Idiosyncratic Verb Structures; 5.1.5.1 Categorical Inflection?; 5.1.5.2 Bahamian Verbs; 5.1.5.3 Verbs of Cognition, Communication, and Perception; 5.1.5.4 Other Problematic Verbs; 5.1.6 Syntactic Peculiarities; 5.1.6.1 Zero Subjects; 5.1.6.2 Questions; 5.1.6.3 Negation; 5.1.6.4 Passive Constructions; 5.1.6.5 Subordinate Clauses
Control code
ocn774289096
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (access may be restricted)
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Access restricted to subscribing institution
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Urban Bahamian Creole : system and variation, Stephanie Hackert, (electronic resource/)
Link
http://library.quincycollege.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=410710
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Urban Bahamian Creole System and variation; Editorial page; Title page; Copyright page; Table of contents; Map; Abbreviations; List of Tables; List of Figures; Acknowledgements; CHAPTER 1. Introduction; CHAPTER 2. Methodology; 2.1 Previous Research on Language in the Bahamas; 2.2 Tense, Mood, and Aspect in Creoles: Models and Approaches; 2.2.1 Bickertons Analysis of Creole TMA Systems; 2.2.2 Linguistic Typology and TMA; 2.3 Fieldwork and Data Analysis; 2.3.1 Eliciting Conversational Data; 2.3.1.1 Entering the Community and Building a Sample; 2.3.1.2 The Sociolinguistic Interview
  • 2.3.1.3 The Subsample2.3.2 Quantitative Analysis; 2.3.3 The Tense-Mood-Aspect Questionnaire; 2.3.4 The Professionals Sample; 2.3.5 Terminology and Orthography; CHAPTER 3. Sociohistory and Sociolinguistics; 3.1 The Bahamas: Topography and Population; 3.2 English in the Bahamas: From Contact to Creole; 3.2.1 The Early Colonial Period; 3.2.2 Loyalist Times; 3.2.3 The Abolition of the Slave Trade and Beyond; 3.3 The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries; 3.3.1 The Urban Experience; 3.3.2 A Brief Social Geography of Nassau Today; 3.4 The Sociolinguistics of Bahamian Creole English
  • 3.4.1 Language and Politics3.4.2 Language and the Media; 3.4.3 Language and Education; CHAPTER 4. Past Temporal Reference: Categories, Meanings, and Uses; 4.1 Aspect: Perfective, Progressive, Habitual, and Completive; 4.1.1 The Unmarked Verb; 4.1.2 Imperfective Categories; 4.1.2.1 The Progressive; 4.1.2.2 Habituais; 4.1.3 The Completive; 4.1.3.1 Main- Verbal done; 4.1.3.2 The Syntax and Semantics of Completive done; 4.2 Tense: The Relative Past; 4.2.1 The Use of did in Bahamian Creole; 4.2.2 Preverbal did; 4.2.2.1 Did as an AnteriorMarker?; 4.2.2.2 Did as a Relative Past Marker?
  • 4.2.2.3 Did as a Background Marker?4.2.2.4 Speaker Perceptions and Social Profile of did; 4.3 Perfect Meanings and Their Realizations; 4.4 Copula Structures; 4.5 Past Reference in Urban Bahamian Creole: A Summary; CHAPTER 5. Past Marking by Verb Inflection; 5.1 Circumscribing the Envelope of Variation: Count and Dont Count Cases; 5.1.1 Lexical Verbs in Finite Form; 5.1.2 Absolute Past Temporal Reference; 5.1.2.1 Perfect Structures; 5.1.2.2 Past Habituais; 5.1.2.3 Progressive Meaning; 5.1.2.4 Indirect or Reported Speech; 5.1.2.5 Absolute Past Structures Excluded
  • 5.1.3 Non-Past Reference5.1.3.1 Inclusive Time; 5.1.3.2 Irrealis Contexts; 5.1.4 Discourse-Specific Characteristics; 5.1.4.1 Hesitation, False Starts, Ellipsis, Repetition; 5.1.4.2 Fixed Expressions and Imitative Speech; 5.1.4.3 Indeterminate Cases; 5.1.5 Idiosyncratic Verb Structures; 5.1.5.1 Categorical Inflection?; 5.1.5.2 Bahamian Verbs; 5.1.5.3 Verbs of Cognition, Communication, and Perception; 5.1.5.4 Other Problematic Verbs; 5.1.6 Syntactic Peculiarities; 5.1.6.1 Zero Subjects; 5.1.6.2 Questions; 5.1.6.3 Negation; 5.1.6.4 Passive Constructions; 5.1.6.5 Subordinate Clauses
Control code
ocn774289096
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (access may be restricted)
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Access restricted to subscribing institution
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
eBooks on EBSCOhost
Specific material designation
remote

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